Smoke Signals: Selected Writing
  
Smoke Signals: Selected Writing
Simon Chapman
Darlington Press
ISBN: 9781921364594

Smoke Signals gathers 71 of Professor Simon Chapman’s authoritative, acerbic and often heretical essays written in newspapers, blogs and research journals across his 40-year career. They cover major developments and debates in tobacco control, public health ethics, cancer screening, gun control and panics about low risk agents like wi-fi, mobile phone towers and wind turbines. This collection is an essential guide to many key debates in contemporary public health. It will be invaluable to public health students and practitioners, while remaining compelling reading for all interested in health policy.


“When is Simon Chapman, the academic, intellectual, self-appointed chief wowser of the nanny state, gunna leave us alone?”
Steve Price, Australian radio broadcaster, 2008


“His insane wibblings are worrying yes, but still bloody funny to read.”
Dick Puddlecote, English blogger


You can view the preliminary pages and introduction in the Sydney eScholarship Repository

Digital editions

Digital editions of Smoke Signals are now available for purchase through Google Play and the iBookstore. Click the below links to download the appropriate ebook format for your device. To request another format, please email us.

About the author

Simon Chapman AO is emeritus professor in public health at the University of Sydney. He has won the World Health Organization’s medal for tobacco control (1998), the American Cancer Society’s Luther Terry Award for outstanding individual leadership in tobacco control (2003), and was the NSW Premier’s Cancer Researcher of the Year (2008). In 2013 he was made an Officer in the Order of Australia for his contributions to public health and named 2013 Australian Skeptic of the Year. In 2014, the Australian right-wing think tank, the Institute of Public Affairs, named him as one of Australia’s Dirty Dozen all-time “opponents of freedom”.

Other titles from Simon Chapman

Simon Chapman AO has written several books published by Sydney University Press and Darlington Press in the last 10 years. Several of these are also available open access, and may be downloaded for free online.

cover image of Over our dead bodies book

Over our dead bodies: Port Arthur and Australia’s fight for gun control
The Port Arthur massacre in 1996 transformed Australia's gun control debate, but law reform is not inevitable. It requires the planned, strategic use of media and advocacy to convert anger into action. This book – the story of the campaign for gun control – is a practical guide to achieving humane social change.


cover image of Let sleeping dogs lie book

Let sleeping dogs lie? What men should know before getting tested for prostate cancer
Medicine is today still unable to predict with precision which early-discovered prostate cancers will turn out to be those that kill. This book aims to provide a detailed examination of the main questions that a man should ask before being tested, in order to make better informed decisions.


cover image of Removing the emperor's clothes book

Removing the emperor’s clothes: Australia and tobacco plain packaging
In December 2012, Australia became the first nation in the world to require all tobacco products to be sold in standard ‘plain’ packs. Simon Chapman and Becky Freeman set out the evidence for the importance of plain packaging in striking at the heart of what remains of tobacco advertising.


cover image of Wind turbine syndrome book

Coming in 2017: Wind turbine syndrome: a communicated disease
In a forthcoming title, Simon Chapman takes on so-called Wind Turbine Syndrome. It will be a critical account of the rise of the anti-wind farm movement, including a detailed examination of the evidence for nocebo/psychogenic effects and the strategies used by anti-wind farm interests. If you would like to be notified when this title is released, please email us now.


Permanent link to this page: http://purl.library.usyd.edu.au/sup/smokesignals.

  
Paperback
A$40.00